Little Huguenots After-School Program
Nov
13
to Dec 18

Little Huguenots After-School Program

  • Historic Huguenot Street (map)
  • Google Calendar ICS

Do you wish you had more time to let your child help you in the kitchen or to create a craft?  Then we have the program for you! Each week kids will have a chance to create something new. Whether it be making their own Dutch Apple Pie or crafting a mini-stone house, kids will have the opportunity to discover, create, explore and more!  

GRADES: 3 to 5 (Ages 8 to 11)
This program is open only to 3rd-to-5th-grade students at Lenape Elementary School

DATES: Tuesdays November 13 to December 11, 4 to 5:30 PM December 18 is a tentative makeup day

LOCATION: Students will take Bus 124 from Lenape Elementary School to Deyo Hall, 6 Broadhead Avenue, New Paltz Parents/guardians must pick students up at Deyo Hall

PRICE: $95 for a 5-week session

Contact Alyssa Bruno, School Programming Coordinator, at alyssa@huguenotstreet.org or (845) 255-1660 ext. 118 with questions

All after-school program staff members and volunteers have passed a background check.

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"An Artist's Interpretation of New York History," a talk with Len Tantillo
Dec
14
6:30 PM18:30

"An Artist's Interpretation of New York History," a talk with Len Tantillo

Fall Harvest Gala donors receive a free reception and talk with Len.

Reception from 6:00 – 6:30 PM

 "An Artist's Interpretation of New York History"

From the artist: Over the past thirty years I have tried to illustrate aspects of the early history of New York State. The source of my inspiration is derived from the vast and varied knowledge of numerous New York historians along with the study of contemporaneous primary source graphic documents such as maps, drawings and paintings. I believe that picturing the past is one of the most effective ways to engage an audience, pique their interest and hopefully increase their awareness of regional history.

 Len Tantillo (b. 1946 - ) is a graduate of the Rhode Island School of Design. Tantillo is a licensed architect who left the field of architecture in 1986 to pursue a career in the fine art of historical and marine painting. Since that time, his work has appeared internationally in exhibitions, publications and film documentaries. He is the author of four books, and the recipient of two honorary degrees. He is a Fellow of the American Society of Marine Artists. His work is included in the collections of the Fenimore Art Museum, the Minnesota Museum of Marine Art, Albany Institute of History and Art, Noble Maritime Collection at Sailor’s Snug Harbor, numerous historical societies, and corporate and private collections in the USA and abroad. In 2004 he was commissioned by the Metropolitan Museum of Art to create a painting depicting the Daniel Winne house as it may have appeared in 1755.


For more information visit: lftantillo.com

Public Admission to talk - $15 general admission, $13.50 HHS members, seniors, students, active military members, and veterans

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CHOCOLATE: The History of Chocolate in the Hudson Valley
Dec
8
2:00 PM14:00

CHOCOLATE: The History of Chocolate in the Hudson Valley

CHOCOLATE: The History of Chocolate in the Hudson Valley, educational talk with Peter G. Rose

The Hudson Valley’s trading and manufacturing history of what is now our favorite confection, but started as an invigorating and nourishing drink, will be discussed in a PP presentation by Food Historian Peter G. Rose. She will describe the early trade by the Valley’s Dutch settlers in the 17th century and the subsequent manufacturing developments of chocolate through the 18th century into the late 19th century. She will end with some useful facts on working with today’s chocolate. A recipe sheet will be available as a hand-out. Rose was part of a group of more than 100 scholars, who investigated the history of chocolate in America, sponsored by the Historic Division of Mars, Inc., which culminated in a book Chocolate: History, Culture & Heritage (Wiley, 2009). 

Admission comes with one serving of drinking chocolate based on Rose’s recipe, provided by the Village Tea Room.

Culinary historian Peter G. Rose is the author of nine books on the Dutch influence in America and Hudson Valley food. She has lectured on a variety of topics related to Dutch and Dutch-American culinary history recently at: The University of Amsterdam, but also at The National Gallery; The Smithsonian Institute; Harvard University's Fogg Museum;  New York University; the New York State Library; the New York Historical Society; as well as more than a hundred other historical societies and libraries in New York State and various museums in the Netherlands, including the Mauritshuis National Picture Gallery in The Hague.

Tickets are $15 (10% for seniors, students, HHS members, active military members, and veterans.) One serving of drinking chocolate comes with the price of admission.

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A Holiday on Huguenot Street & Community Tree Lighting
Nov
30
to Dec 1

A Holiday on Huguenot Street & Community Tree Lighting

  • Historic Huguenot Street (map)
  • Google Calendar ICS

Historic Huguenot Street and the Reformed Church of New Paltz present A Holiday on Huguenot Street on November 30 and December 1, featuring holiday tours, a craft fair, horse-drawn wagon rides, farm animals, and more. The series of events will begin at 5 pm on Friday, November 30, with Historic Huguenot Street’s special Holiday Tours that last about 45 minutes and will be taking place at 5, 6, and 8 PM.

This year’s A Holiday on Huguenot Street tours will explore seasonal and holiday traditions practiced by different cultures in New Paltz over the centuries. The tour will begin at the replica Esopus Munsee wigwam where an interpreter will share traditional Munsee stories and New Year customs. Next, visitors will watch a vignette in the Abraham Hasbrouck House featuring two actors portraying Hasbrouck children in the mid-18th century as they delve into French Huguenot and Dutch traditions. Finally, tour-takers will become special guests of the Deyo House during an in-the-moment tour with Gertrude Deyo Brodhead, a wealthy Victorian socialite, who will share all of her lavish Christmas plans in her meticulously-decorated home. Tours will run about 45 minutes long.

From 5 to 8 pm, the Misty Mountain Girl Scout Troop will host a cookie walk to support Local at Heart, while working toward their Community Service and Cooking badges. Also at 5 pm, the Reformed Church’s annual Craft Fair will open in the Wullschleger Education Building, followed by Soup on the Stoop on the steps of the Church at 6 pm. Greens, crafts, and ornaments are being sold in the education building Friday 5 to 8 pm and Saturday 9 to 2 pm.

At 7 pm the community will participate in a Paper Lantern Light Parade, beginning at the Reformed Church and proceeding to the Deyo House lawn for Historic Huguenot Street’s annual Community Tree Lighting. Luminaries will line the street and paper lanterns will be available for purchase at the Museum Shop. Paper lanterns may be pre-ordered in advance online at huguenotstreet.org/shop and can be purchased that evening at the Craig House at 18 Broadhead Avenue. During the tree lighting, come listen to festive holiday carols performed by Historic Huguenot Street’s own a cappella choir, the Huguenot Heralds!

Guests are welcome to take free photos with Santa on the Deyo House porch following the tree lighting until 8 PM, at which point the Reformed Church will host a free holiday concert in the sanctuary with local musical group Wind and Stone.  

On Saturday, December 1, Historic Huguenot Street’s Holiday Tours will be leaving from the Museum Shop at 10 am, 11 am, 1 pm, 2 pm, 3 pm, and 4 pm. The Misty Mountain Girl Scout Troop will continue their cookie walk from 10 am to 3 pm. 

In the Wullschleger Education Building from 9 am to 2 pm, children can participate in a build a bear workshop.

At 11 am, all are invited to the Church’s Christmas Café in the Social Hall (92 Huguenot Street) until 2 pm. Immediately after, there will be a free holiday concert featuring the Big Blue Big Band in the Church’s sanctuary.

Beginning at 12 pm, Historic Huguenot Street will host horse-drawn wagon rides along the street. Rides will be available every 15 minutes from 12 to 3 pm for $5 (children 3 and under are free), departing from the DuBois Fort. Visitors can also meet and pet local farm animals and learn about these friendly creatures from our local 4-H members.

Sponsored by Americas Best Value Inn of New Paltz, Ulster Savings Bank, Riverside Bank, A Division of Salisbury Bank and Trust Company, Redfin, and Stewart’s Shops.


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Van de oude wereld naar de nieuwe: Netherlandish Architecture, its roots, forms, and legacy
Nov
8
6:30 PM18:30

Van de oude wereld naar de nieuwe: Netherlandish Architecture, its roots, forms, and legacy

Members, donors, prospective supporters receive a free reception and talk by Ian Stewart.

Reception from 6:00 – 6:30 PM

"Van de oude wereld naar de nieuwe: Netherlandish Architecture, its roots, forms, and legacy,” lecture with Ian Stewart from 6:30 – 8:30 PM

Ian Stewart will discuss the architecture of the Netherlands, which was imported to the New World, and persisted for two centuries. Drawing from Old World examples, he will compare and contrast building forms and styles between the Netherlandish areas of Europe, and the area formerly known as New Netherland.  He will discuss domestic, agricultural, and industrial construction forms which follow traditional "Dutch" patterns, as well as discussing the various "Anglo Dutch" hybrid buildings which arise in the years after the fall of New Netherland, well into the 19th Century.  This will be followed by a Question and Answer period.

 Ian Stewart has been working the preservation trades field for over a decade.  He is a rare combination of tradesperson and academic. Dedicated to the furtherance of the traditional trades and crafts in America, Ian was the President of the Board of Directors of the Preservation Trades Network, is a member of the Timber Framer’s Guild, and is a member of the Traditional Timber Frame Research Advisory Group (TTRAG).  Ian holds a Master’s degree in Preservation Studies at Boston University’s School of American and New England Studies. His thesis focused on Anglo Dutch houses of the Hudson Valley, particularly those built prior to 1830.  Ian’s primary area of research has been the buildings constructed by Netherlandish immigrants to the United States, as well as the origins of those styles in Belgium and the Netherlands.  His work in this field was recently recognized by the New Netherland Institute, who awarded him the Alice P. Kenney award in 2018.  Ian constantly strives to bring attention to this unique style of construction, which has been greatly overlooked, despite its influence in American architecture.

 Public Admission - $10 general admission, $8 seniors, students

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Nov
7
9:00 AM09:00

Risk Management for Collections

Greater Hudson Heritage Network is offering a special workshop on November 7th on Risk Management for Collections that will take place at Historic Huguenot Street and will guide users smoothly through the steps of the risk management process. The workshop is co-presented by the Cultural Heritage Agency of the Netherlands and the NYS Parks, Recreation & Historic Preservation. Space is limited to 25 people

Risk management is an integral part of the decision-making process for organizational stewardship. It is especially useful for those responsible for the care, survival, and accessibility of our cultural heritage. Risk management not only involves immediate risks to the safety of objects and collections, but also encompasses all the threats to which they are exposed; both events (such as fire, flooding and theft) as well as processes (including fading due to light, cracks from dehydration, and tarnishing caused by pollution). This workshop is intended to guide users smoothly through the steps of the risk management process.  Risk Management for Collections is a strategy developed by the Cultural Heritage Agency of the Netherlands (Rijksdienst voor het Cultureel Erfgoed, or RCE). The RCE strategy identifies, analyzes, and evaluates risks to collections. 

The Risk Management for Collections program concentrates on the further development of a user-friendly method of risk management. This program, presented by Dr. Bart Ankersmit and Renate van Leijen will make this method accessible to and provide attendees with the necessary information so that small organizations with limited resources may conduct risk assessments and manage relevant risks.

This full-day workshop includes a lite breakfast, networking luncheon, and resource packet.

GHHN Members: $45.00

Nonmembers: $55.00

Workshop Fee includes light breakfast, lunch, and resource packet.

Contact

Kerry Sclafani
Greater Hudson Heritage Network
914.592.6726
info@greaterhudson.org

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Trick-or-Treat on Huguenot Street
Oct
31
3:30 PM15:30

Trick-or-Treat on Huguenot Street

Following four successful years of this annual tradition on Huguenot Street, children and families are welcome to once again walk the street on Halloween night, October 31, trick-or-treating at the historic houses from 3:30 pm to 5:30 pm. 

Free and open to the public, a portion of Huguenot Street will be closed to vehicular traffic while children trick-or-treat. Children and adults can expect to meet "residents" that span the National Historic Landmark District's centuries-long history, including colonial-era women, Revolutionary War soldiers, a Victorian-era socialite and her house maid, flappers from the Roaring Twenties, and other costumed interpreters.

Sponsored by Ulster Savings Bank.

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Mold: Prevention, Detection, Recovery (Presented by DHPSNY)
Oct
16
9:00 AM09:00

Mold: Prevention, Detection, Recovery (Presented by DHPSNY)

A workshop presented by Documentary Heritage & Preservation Services for New York (DHPSNY) with speaker Gillian Marcus, Preservation Specialist, DHPSNY.

Mold can stain artifacts and weaken paper, books, textiles, and proteinaceous materials such as leather. It can also cause health problems for staff and visitors. This half-day workshop will discuss how to identify mold, the environmental factors that allow mold to grow and thrive, and how to prevent an outbreak. Personal Protective Equipment (PPE) and procedures for handling the health risks of a mold outbreak will also be discussed. Attendees will learn best practices for cleaning moldy books and papers, as well as identifying when it’s necessary to call a conservator or a professional mold remediation company.

This is a half-day session, with morning (9:00 AM - 12:00 PM) and afternoon (2:00 - 5:00 PM) sessions. Registration is limited to 20 participants per session.  

Program times:
Choose one when registering
9:00 AM - 12:00 PM
OR
2:00 - 5:00 PM

Important Registration Information:

  • The registration deadline for each workshop is two weeks before the workshop date.
  • You must complete a separate registration for each individual attending the workshop. You must complete the entire registration form for each attendee to guarantee a spot at the workshop. 
  • A reminder email will be sent one week prior to each workshop date. If you believe you have registered but have not received a reminder, please contact DHPSNY at info@dhpsny.org to confirm that you are registered.
  • If online registration is inconvenient, you may also call DHPSNY at (215) 545-0613
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Living in Style: A Special Tour With George Way
Oct
14
2:00 PM14:00

Living in Style: A Special Tour With George Way

Historic Huguenot Street (HHS) has extended the special exhibition Living in Style: Selections from the George Way Collection of Dutch Fine and Decorative Art until December 16, 2018. Featuring more than 100 17th- and 18th-century Dutch items from the Netherlands—including 22 oil paintings, a rich diversity of interior furnishings, and decorative and utilitarian objects—the exhibition is installed in a period room in the historic Jean Hasbrouck House (ca. 1721) and celebrates the Dutch culture that flourished in the 1600s and 1700s in New York State’s New Netherland Colony.

George Way will lead a private exhibition tour Sunday, October 14, at 2 PM. Private tours are $20 ($18 for seniors, active military members, veterans, students, and members).

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Haunted Huguenot Street
Oct
12
to Oct 28

Haunted Huguenot Street

  • Historic Huguenot Street (map)
  • Google Calendar ICS

Infection and disease during the colonial period were mysterious and ubiquitous. Eighteenth-century doctors attempted to diagnose and treat these illnesses to the best of their knowledge, but too often, their treatments caused insurmountable pain, and in the worst cases, fatality. During the 2018 Haunted Huguenot Street tours, you will discover some of the dangerous diseases that plagued the early New Paltz community, and witness theatrical demonstrations of the remedies that were used in an attempt to cure them.

Tours begin at 5 PM and leave from the Dubois Fort Visitor Center every hour on the hour, with the last tour of the evening leaving at 9 PM.

Friday, October 12
Saturday, October 13
Thursday, October 18
Friday, October 19
Saturday, October 20
Thursday, October 25
Friday, October 26
Saturday, October 27
Sunday, October 28

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HHS Cider Market & Tasting at Applestock
Oct
6
11:00 AM11:00

HHS Cider Market & Tasting at Applestock

Historic Huguenot Street will host its fourth-annual hard cider market and tasting this year at Applestock on Saturday, October 6, at the Reformed Church of New Paltz, 92 Huguenot Street. This year’s market will feature numerous New York State cideries, wineries, and breweries. In addition to ciders, vendors will be selling other products from their orchards and farms, including fresh-cut flowers, local apples, apple-cider donuts, and more. Tickets to enter the tent are $10 a person. Designated drivers and individuals under the age of 21 may enter for free.

 

The HHS Cider Market & Tasting at Applestock is sponsored by Lothrop Associates, Riverside Bank a Division of Salisbury Bank and Trust Company, and Ulster Savings Bank.

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Fall Harvest Celebration
Sep
22
6:00 PM18:00

Fall Harvest Celebration

Historic Huguenot Street’s Fall Harvest Celebration returns September 22. Come enjoy the region’s agricultural heritage with a delicious farm-to-table dinner amid the site’s historic stone houses. 

Throughout the evening, you’ll celebrate the change of seasons on Huguenot Street’s historic grounds in the company of fellow preservation enthusiasts while benefiting the history that you love. To learn more about the Fall Harvest Celebration, please contact Historic Huguenot Street’s Development Department at 845-255-1660 ext. 104.

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Old New Paltz Stone House Day
Sep
8
11:00 AM11:00

Old New Paltz Stone House Day

HHS is pleased to announce a special revival of Stone House Day, a formerly annual tradition, which will be hosted in partnership with the Town of New Paltz. On Saturday, September 8, the National Historic Landmark District will host Old New Paltz Stone House Day to celebrate the 340th anniversary of the settling of New Paltz.

After nearly ten years, HHS is bringing back Old New Paltz Stone House Day, with a stronger focus on the diversity of Hudson Valley history. It will be a celebration of all the cultures that impacted New Paltz and Ulster County including African, Dutch, English, Esopus Munsee, and French.

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"Moments of Discovery: Research Revelations in Local History," a talk with local author and historian Marc B. Fried
Aug
30
7:00 PM19:00

"Moments of Discovery: Research Revelations in Local History," a talk with local author and historian Marc B. Fried

Ulster County and Shawangunk region historian Marc B. Fried is author of six books of local history and nature writing. In his 50 years perusing Dutch and English colonial manuscripts, court and church records and maps both ancient and modern, and in his extensive interviews with local huckleberry pickers and forest rangers and treks through the Shawangunk Mountains and Rondout and Wallkill valleys, Fried has solved many seemingly intractable historical and geographical mysteries and shed light on local legends and folklore.

In this talk, Fried will discuss some of the more dramatic discoveries he has written about and the sources, methods and perspectives that helped reveal the past and separate fact from fiction. A question and answer period and book signing will follow his talk.

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A Special Archaeology Tour With Professor Joe Diamond
Aug
2
7:00 PM19:00

A Special Archaeology Tour With Professor Joe Diamond

Join SUNY New Paltz Professor Joseph Diamond for a special tour of an archaeological excavation site on the grounds of Historic Huguenot Street and learn about the artifacts left by the original settlers and the Native Americans who came before them. Every summer professor Diamond brings students from his field school to conduct a live archaeology dig on site. Many of the class’s findings over the years are household items most likely left behind by Huguenot settlers or Lenape tribes. However, Diamond and his students have found a number of prehistoric pointed spearheads dating back as far as 5,000 years.

$15 to attend. 10% discounts for member, seniors, students, active military members, and veterans. Beverages, such as cider, beer, and seltzer will be available for visitors to enjoy. Pre-registration is highly encouraged. 

All tours begin at the DuBois Fort Visitor Center (81 Huguenot Street).

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Young Writers Program
Jul
30
to Aug 3

Young Writers Program

Led by the region's finest teachers, the Hudson Valley Writing Project offers children and teens unique learning experiences at local cultural and historic sites, nature preserves, and college campuses.

In one adventurous week, young writers ages 10 - 14 will tour historic stone houses, explore a wildlife sanctuary, and spend time on a working farm as they learn and write about the remarkably rich history of this land and its people.

Register at http://www.newpaltz.edu/hvwp/summercamps.

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In Her Words: A Women's History Tour
Jul
29
to Aug 25

In Her Words: A Women's History Tour

Developed by Historic Huguenot Street's public programming department with the assistance of SUNY New Paltz intern Allison Surgeary, the tour will follow the lives and stories of several women who played a role in local history. Visitors will be guided through four historic buildings and have the opportunity to discover figures from the past through a combination of factual, historical information and cleverly composed monologues written and recorded by HHS staff and volunteers. 

Register for a tour:

General admission is $15. Discounted tickets for members, seniors, students, active military members, and veterans are $13.50. Pre-registration is highly encouraged. 

Sunday, July 29, 11 AM
Saturday, August 25, 11 AM

All tours begin at the DuBois Fort Visitor Center (81 Huguenot Street).

Visitors will hear the stories of the Esopus women who signed the 1677 Indian Deed; Catherine Blanchan (1629 - 1713), one of the original New Paltz Huguenot settlers; enslaved Africans Rachel and Dinah; Wyntje Hasbrouck (1708 – 1787), a colonial woman who managed her own estate; Cornelia Markle VanWagenen (1775 – 1819), a widow who ran her own business in the early 1800s; Julia “Aunt Judy” Jackson (ca. 1800 – 1898), a freed slave; Eliza Varick Silvernail Ackert (1830 – 1916), the first female editor of the original New Paltz Times; Progressive-era artist Julia McEntee Dillon (1834 – 1919); and Mary Jane Snyder Freer (1862 – 1931), the first New Paltz woman to vote in 1918.

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Camp Huguenot
Jul
23
to Jul 27

Camp Huguenot

Campers are invited to discover, explore, and experience Historic Huguenot Street, where they will learn about the site, its unique history, and the individuals who settled New Paltz over 300 years ago!

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Haunted Huguenot Street Walking Tour
Jul
22
4:00 PM16:00

Haunted Huguenot Street Walking Tour

You’ve heard of old haunted houses—but do you know the stories of the spirits who haunt them? Explore the 340-year-old street with a guide who will share thrilling, eerie, and mysterious tales from the darker history of New Paltz and Huguenot Street. Hear stories of past residents who lived in the stone homes and experienced terrible tragedies, encountered apparitions, and held paranormal investigations. New Paltz history is so alive that it even comes back from the dead.

Admission: $10 

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New Paltz in the War for Independence
Jul
7
10:00 AM10:00

New Paltz in the War for Independence

Historic Huguenot Street will host a Revolutionary War encampment on Saturday, July 7, with the 5th New York Regiment. The original 5th New York Regiment included many soldiers from Orange and Ulster counties.

At the camp site, living historians from the 5th New York Regiment will demonstrate marching and drilling, showing how arms at the time were handled and fired. An armament demonstration will display various types of muskets and weaponry while members of the regiment explain how they were used, fired, and maintained. Wedge-style tents and a dining “fly” will serve as the backdrop on the Huguenot Street grounds.

Additional demonstrations and displays will reveal aspects of civilian life, including candle making, woodworking, musket ball and cartridge manufacturing, and colonial cooking. Children can participate in reenactment military drills and various colonial games. 

The encampment is free and open to the public, rain or shine.

Sponsored by Americas Best Value Inn of New PaltzUlster Savings BankRiverside Bank a Division of Salisbury Bank & Trust Company, and Lothrop Associates.

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A Recipe for Disaster: Murder Mystery at the Old Fort Restaurant
Jun
22
to Jun 30

A Recipe for Disaster: Murder Mystery at the Old Fort Restaurant

Friday, June 22
Saturday, June 23
Friday, June 29
Saturday, June 30 - SOLD OUT

Experience a special two-weekend revival of the Old Fort Restaurant on Huguenot Street with actors portraying characters inspired by historic New Paltz figures such as Elsie Oates, the proprietor of the Old Fort (1938–1972); Alice Crans, the cook; and many others. There will be four opportunities to attend this dinner-theater performance: Friday, June 22; Saturday, June 23; Friday, June 29; and Saturday, June 30; all at 6 PM.

The year is 1958, and Elsie Oates has invited you to celebrate the 20th anniversary of the opening of her restaurant. However, the pleasant evening is derailed when a mysterious visitor arrives and causes quite a stir. Help the Old Fort staff and its neighbors uncover the truth in this whodunit immersive dinner-theater experience.

Come dressed in your best midcentury attire and enjoy a meal inspired by classic Alice Crans recipes. When you arrive at the DuBois Fort Visitor Center for the event, you may also have the opportunity to play a role in the evening and portray a 1958 New Paltz resident. Please plan to arrive 15 minutes early, as the performance will begin promptly at 6 PM.

General Admission: $65
HHS Members: $60 + one additional raffle ticket

Admission will include:
An immersive dinner-theater experience
One three-course meal (family-style)
Soft drinks, wine, and beer
One raffle ticket

MENU

Relish Tray: Preserved lemon whipped ricotta, pickled red onions, and croutons

Entree: Pot roast of beef or zucchini & eggplant au gratin, parsley potatoes, and buttered green beans

Dessert: Date nut pudding with hard sauce

Catering by Duo Bistro, duo bistro.com

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Family Day: Free Admission
Jun
17
10:00 AM10:00

Family Day: Free Admission

Enjoy free admissions to Historic Huguenot Street on June 17. This includes admissions into the historic house tours and exhibits. Bring a blanket and bagged lunch and have a picnic on our grounds. Enjoy a day with the family as you learn about the families who founded New Paltz.

This event is part of New York State's Path Through History Weekend.

 

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"The Huguenot Silversmiths of London," a lecture by Dr. Tessa Murdoch
May
10
4:00 PM16:00

"The Huguenot Silversmiths of London," a lecture by Dr. Tessa Murdoch

From the mid-16th century French protestant refugee craftsmen settled in London where they enjoyed freedom of worship and the opportunity to practise their skills. The patronage of goldsmiths in war-torn France in the late 17th century was forbidden by the French King Louis XIV. Renewed persecution of the Huguenots, as French protestants were known, resulted in an increased exodus of talent that joined already established networks of craftsmen in London. Although in the late 17th century the first generation silversmiths introduced new forms of secular plate and high quality workmanship, the second generation craftsmen, Paul de Lamerie and Paul Crespin achieved an even greater reputation. Their skills appealed to a wide range of contemporary patrons. 

Whereas first generation smiths made for aristocratic patrons including George Booth, 2nd Earl of Warrington and William Cavendish, 1st Duke of Devonshire, the second generation craftsmen made for a wider circle including their fellow craftsmen. The network which the Huguenot silversmiths maintained amongst their own community and the care with which they nurtured their patrons, created a monopoly which provoked a hostile reaction from native silversmiths. In order to sustain their own business, the native smiths often employed Huguenot journeymen who gradually infiltrated the London workforce. The remarkable three generation dynasty of Courtauld family silversmiths is a tribute to the tenacity with which the Huguenot craftsmen and women maintained their place at the centre of this skilled workforce.

Tessa Murdoch’s PhD "Huguenot artists, designers and craftsmen in Great Britain and Ireland, 1680-1760," University of London, 1982, fed into the Museum of London exhibition The Quiet Conquest: The Huguenots 1685-1985. Elected Fellow of the Society of Antiquaries in 1988, she joined V&A Furniture and Woodwork in 1990 assisting with research for the acclaimed British Galleries. In 2002 she was appointed Deputy Keeper, Sculpture, Metalwork, Ceramics and Glass and Head of Metalwork.

She was lead curator for the V&A’s 2005 Sacred Silver and Stained Glass Galleries and the 2009 Rosalinde and Arthur Gilbert Galleries. Publications include Noble Households: Eighteenth Century Inventories of Great English Houses (2006) and Beyond the Border: Huguenot Goldsmiths in Northern Europe and North America (2008). For the 2012/2013 exchange of exhibitions between the V&A and the Moscow Kremlin Museums she co-edited The Golden Age of the English Court from Henry VIII to Charles I, Moscow, 2012, and London, 2013, Treasures of the Royal Courts:Tudors, Stuarts & the Russian Tsars. Going for Gold: Craftsmanship and Collecting of Gold Boxes (2014), the proceedings of a V&A/Wallace Collection conference held in 2010, was co-edited with Heike Zech. In September 2015, she co-edited and contributed on sculpture and clocks to Burning Bright: Essays in honour of David Bindman published by UCL Press and available for download. She curated an exhibition of Musical Clocks in 2013 for Handel House Museum. Recent acquisitions by Huguenot craftsmen include for the Rosalinde and Arthur Gilbert Collection include a royal Christening gift purchased at TEFAF Maastricht in 2014 and for the V&A a royal mantel clock, purchased at Masterpiece, London, 2016.

Pictured: Tureen (Detail), 1751-52, Samuel Courtauld I, The Courtauld Gallery

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“Sex and the City: The Early Years,” presented by author Bill Greer
May
5
2:00 PM14:00

“Sex and the City: The Early Years,” presented by author Bill Greer

“Sex and the City: The Early Years” looks at the bawdy world of Dutch New York from 1624 to 1664. Through anecdotes of real people and events, the talk examines the rather libertine culture Europeans brought to the Hudson Valley and how that culture engendered an independent streak that fueled a rebellion of the common people against their rulers. This conflict, many historians argue, laid the foundation for the pluralistic, freedom-loving society that America became.

Bill Greer has spent much of his working life in the heart of New Amsterdam.  He was a trustee of the New Netherland Institute from 2008 to 2015 and received the Institute’s Howard G. Hageman award for his contributions to launch the New Netherland Research Center in the New York State Library. His novel of New Amsterdam, The Mevrouw Who Saved Manhattan, paints a real and humorous portrait of Dutch life on the Hudson through the eyes of a sharp-tongued bride who comes among the first settlers.

$10 general admission
$9 for for seniors, students, members, and members of the armed service

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Opening Day
May
5
10:00 AM10:00

Opening Day

Regularly-scheduled tours will resume and the DuBois Fort Visitor Center and Museum Shop will re-open for the season. Ninety-minute tours of the site will take place hourly on the hour, beginning at 10 am, with the final tour starting at 4 pm, every day except Wednesdays.

Sponsored by Ulster Savings Bank.

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Pinkster
Apr
28
4:00 PM16:00

Pinkster

Historic Huguenot Street’s Spring Celebration Pinkster Festival will include a mix of the traditional Dutch and African customs that made this event so popular in early America.

The celebration of Pinkster was brought to what would become the Northeastern United States by Dutch colonists in the 17th century. Pinkster was a religious holiday celebrated on the seventh Sunday after Easter (Pentecost), and was typically recognized by a day of rest, church services, and important religious ceremonies such as baptisms and confirmations. For the Africans enslaved by these Dutch settlers, this day also became a day of rest and celebration for them. 

For the Africans in America, Pinkster reached its peak of popularity between 1790-1810. By this time, the celebration had become primarily African in culture and tradition. Both free and enslaved individuals would travel long distances to attend Pinkster festivals, where they would camp for many days and engage in sports, drinking, music and dance, and other activities that reflected their West African roots, including the election of a Pinkster King and council. This tradition replicated the ceremonies that took place in the prosperous kingdoms of Africa prior to the establishment of the slave trade. 

Historic Huguenot Street’s Spring Celebration Pinkster Festival will highlight the ways in which the free and enslaved Africans in New York and Ulster County transformed this traditionally Christian holiday into a festival that evoked and embraced their West African roots. 

Visitors can expect to experience West African inspired cuisine, traditional African drumming and dance, as well as African games, tours, and more.

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“That class of people called Low Dutch,” African Enslavement Among the Dutch Reformed Churches of Ulster County and New Jersey's Raritan Valley
Apr
7
4:00 PM16:00

“That class of people called Low Dutch,” African Enslavement Among the Dutch Reformed Churches of Ulster County and New Jersey's Raritan Valley

Drawing upon a variety of resources from research facilities in Ulster County and New Brunswick, NJ, Wendy E. Harris and Helene van Rossum will discuss aspects of African enslavement among the Dutch Reformed congregations of Marbletown, Rochester, Wawarsing, and Shawangunk, churches with historic ties to congregations in New Paltz and Kingston. In her memoirs, Sojourner Truth referred to the Dutch communities in Ulster county—to whom her first owner, Colonel Johannes Hardenbergh belonged—as “that class of people called Low Dutch.” The speakers will highlight enslavement among the powerful Hardenbergh family, as well as connections between Dutch Reformed congregations in Ulster County and those in Central New Jersey’s Raritan Valley, traceable through the ministries of Theodorus Jacobus Frelinghuysen (1691–1747), Johannes Frelinghuysen (1727–1754), and Jacob Rutsen Hardenbergh (1736–1790), the first president of Queen’s College (presently Rutgers University).

Wendy E. Harris is an Ulster-born archaeologist and historic preservation consultant. In 2002 she and fellow archaeologist Arnold Pickman formed Cragsmoor Consultants. Unexpected findings from recent projects conducted for the Cragsmoor Conservancy, the Cragsmoor Historical Society and the Village of Ellenville/Town of Wawarsing Joint Historic Preservation Commission led to Harris’s current interest in the history of African enslavement in what were once the Ulster County hinterlands. In June 2016 she and Pickman presented a joint talk at the Cragsmoor Historical Society entitled “Where Slavery Died Hard, The Forgotten History of Ulster County and the Shawangunk Mountains Region.”

Helene van Rossum, a Dutch-born archivist and writer, is the Public Services and Outreach archivist at Rutgers University Special Collections and University Archives. Among the repository’s Dutch holdings she found the farm ledgers of major slave holder Johannes G. Hardenbergh (1731-1811), cousin of Jacob Rutsen Hardenbergh and Colonel Johannes Hardenbergh, which led to her interest in Dutch communities in Ulster County. In June 2017 she presented a joint talk with Thomas Frusciano (Rutgers University Archivist) and John Coakley (Feakes Professor of Church History, Emeritus, at New Brunswick Theological Seminary) in the “Dutch Parsonage,” Somerset, NJ, entitled “Land, Faith, and Slaves. The shared heritage of the Hardenbergh family, Rutgers University, and the Dutch Reformed Church.”

$15 general admission
$13.50 for seniors, members, and members of the armed service

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HYPE Mixer
Apr
4
5:30 PM17:30

HYPE Mixer

Huguenot Young Professionals & Entrepreneurs (HYPE) will meet in the DuBois Fort, and then take a guided tour* through the wigwam, Abraham Hasbrouck House, and Deyo House (5:45-6:35pm; tour led by an HHS guide). Following the tour, Tim Dressel of Kettleborough Cider House will be in the Dubois Fort for a Huguenot Cider tasting (6:45-7:30pm).

Registration is required to attend this event

*Suggested donation of $10 will go directly to HHS to support their upcoming tour season.

Please park in the Reformed Church parking lots (closest to the Visitor Center).

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New Paltz Youth Program 31st Annual Easter Egg Hunt
Mar
24
12:00 PM12:00

New Paltz Youth Program 31st Annual Easter Egg Hunt

Children ages 1 to 12 are invited to participate in the annual hunt for 5,000 eggs. The hunt begins at 1 pm. There will be a bouncy house for the kids to enjoy and the Easter Bunny will be stopping by for a visit. This event is free and open to the public.

Sponsored by the New Paltz Youth Program and the New Paltz Police Department.

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"In Her Words," a lecture and performance
Mar
10
4:00 PM16:00

"In Her Words," a lecture and performance

Following the successful 2017 run of Historic Huguenot Street’s In Her Words: A Women’s History Tour, HHS will host a lecture and performance focusing on the lives of several women who helped shape local history. This lecture will feature actors who will portray these remarkable women, and perform creative monologues written by HHS staff.

Visitors will hear stories and watch performances about an Esopus Munsee woman who signed the 1677 Indian Deed; Catherine Blanchan (1629 – 1713), one of the original New Paltz Huguenot settlers; Rachel, an enslaved African woman; Wyntje Hasbrouck (1708 – 1787), a colonial woman who managed her own estate; Julia “Aunt Judy” Jackson (ca. 1800 – 1898), a freed slave and choir singer; Eliza Ackert (1830 – 1916), the first female editor of the original New Paltz Times; Progressive-era artist Julia McEntee Dillon (1834 – 1919); and Mary Jane Snyder Freer (1862 – 1931), the first New Paltz woman to vote in 1918.

Light refreshments will be served.

$20 general admission
$18 for seniors, members, and members of the armed service

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Screening and Discussion of "Historic Preservation and the Village of New Paltz"
Mar
4
4:00 PM16:00

Screening and Discussion of "Historic Preservation and the Village of New Paltz"

Historic Huguenot Street and the Village of New Paltz Historic Preservation Commission will co-sponsor a public screening of the Historic Preservation Commission's new informational video "Historic Preservation and the Village of New Paltz" on Sunday, March 4, at 4:00 pm at Deyo Hall (6 Broadhead Avenue, New Paltz). 

The video, created with the support of the New York State Office of Parks, Recreation and Historic Preservation and the Village of New Paltz, is about 25 minutes long. It explains the principles of historic architectural preservation and applies them to the local context. Immediately following the screening, the sponsors will invite public comment on any aspect of historic preservation, planning, and development in the community of New Paltz.

The event is free and open to the public. All are warmly welcome to attend.

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