Historic Huguenot Street Hosts Meeting of the
Traditional Timber Frame Research and Advisory Group

 Members of the Traditional Timber Frame Research and Advisory Group (TTRAG) examine timber framing in the attic of the Jean Hasbrouck House, 2017.

Members of the Traditional Timber Frame Research and Advisory Group (TTRAG) examine timber framing in the attic of the Jean Hasbrouck House, 2017.

NEW PALTZ, NY (November 10, 2017) – Historic Huguenot Street recently hosted the annual meeting of the Traditional Timber Frame Research and Advisory Group (TTRAG) at the 10-acre National Historic Landmark District in the Village of New Paltz from October 27-29, 2017.

TTRAG is a special-interest group within the Timber Framers Guild based in Bellingham, Washington, dedicated to serving as a center for information on the centuries-old craft of timber framing. The event brought experts working on timber frame projects on historic buildings, barns, and bridges from around the world to share technical presentations and information. Projects in such diverse locations as Myanmar and Latvia were presented and discussed over the weekend.

While in New Paltz, the timber frame experts also visited each of Historic Huguenot Street’s seven historic house museums to study the methods used to build and restore the houses over the past three hundred years, including the Jean Hasbrouck House (ca. 1721) which was the inspiration for holding the meeting at Huguenot Street. The Jean Hasbrouck House is an extraordinary example of traditional Dutch-American 18th-century architecture. The house’s high-pitched gable roof structure—scheduled for restoration in 2018—spans twice the depth of other stone houses from the period and is believed to be one of a kind in the United States. The house was named a National Historic Landmark in 1967 and serves as the flagship house of Historic Huguenot Street.

About Historic Huguenot Street
A National Historic Landmark District, Historic Huguenot Street is a 501(c)3 non-profit that encompasses 30 buildings across 10 acres comprising the heart of the original 1678 New Paltz settlement, including seven stone houses dating to the early eighteenth century.  Historic Huguenot Street was founded in 1894 as the Huguenot Patriotic, Historical, and Monumental Society to preserve the nationally acclaimed collection of stone houses.  Since then, Historic Huguenot Street has grown into an innovative museum, chartered as an educational corporation by the University of the State of New York Department of Education, that is dedicated to protecting our historic buildings, preserving an important collection of artifacts and manuscripts, and promoting the stories of the Huguenot Street families from the seventeenth century to today.

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Contact
Kaitlin Gallucci
Director of Marketing & Communications
(845) 255-1660
media@huguenotstreet.org