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Mapping the Patent - 340 years later

  • Deyo Hall 6 Broadhead Avenue New Paltz, NY, 12561 United States (map)

On May 26, 1677, 12 Huguenots, Louis DuBois and his sons (Abraham and Isaac), Christian Deyo and his son (Pierre), Jean and Abraham Hasbrouck, Louis Bevier, Anthony Crispell, Hugo Freer, and the LeFevre brothers (Simon and Andre) signed an agreement with sachems of the Esopus for the land that was to be called New Paltz. This tract of land began at the Mohonk cliff, ran to a cove on the Hudson River called Juffrous Hook, continued north along the river to an island within a crooked elbow now called Esopus Island, then ran westerly to a place called Tawaraqui that is now in the town of Rosendale. It amounted to approximately 39,683 acres. In return, the Esopus Indians received 2 horses (1 stallion and 1 mare), tools, knives, oars, woolen cloth and lace, stockings and shirts, blankets, a powder keg, wine, tobacco, and 100 bars of lead, among other items. The deal was completed on September 15, 1677 when Governor Edmund Andros of the Province of New York confirmed this purchase. Two weeks later, on September 29, 1677, Governor Andros issued a patent for the land and made the tract an official township.

This land has not been surveyed until now – 340 years later.

Working with Carol Johnson and Margaret Stanne from the Havilland-Heidgard Historical Collection, Gregory Krupp, a SUNY New Paltz student from the Geography Department, has mapped the land of the original patent and its early divisions. These divisions were made by the members of the Duzine, the twelve men who governed our early township. Krupp was able to identify old boundary and plot lines by applying today’s technology to the information provided by old deeds, maps, town records, and stone walls, which still exist today and were likely built with slave labor.

On Saturday, February 17 at 4:00 PM, Gregory Krupp will be presenting his new map to the public for the second time in Deyo Hall (his original presentation took place at the Elting Memorial Library on Thursday, November 7, 2017). A Q&A portion will follow the presentation.

Lite refreshments will be served. .

$10 general admission
$9 for seniors, members of the armed service, and Friends of Historic Huguenot Street (those who have given more than $50 within the calendar year)